Science Serving Maryland's Coasts

Fellowship Experiences

A blog by and about students supported by Maryland Sea Grant

research fellow, SAV study

Photograph by Debbie Hinkle
Sign up to receive email alerts about new posts

 

My Nontraditional Path to Science Started Outdoors

Joel Bostic • November 15, 2017
I was never very interested in science. Outdoor activities like surfing and kayaking, sports, music – these activities captivated me as an adolescent and into early adulthood. School, and especially science, did little to hold my attention. My teachers told my parents, “Such great potential, if only he would fulfill it.”  Read more . . .
 
Katie sampling septic tanks

Following the Nitrogen to Find the Septic Tanks

Katherine Martin • October 9, 2017
I thought I knew Calvert County well. I had been a 2015 summer intern in Solomons, Maryland, at the Chesapeake Biological Laboratory (CBL) as part of Maryland Sea Grant’s Research Experience for Undergraduates program.  Read more . . .
 
Katie Hornick in boat

The Strength of Diversity: How Genetic Research Could Help Restore Maryland Oysters

Katie Hornick • September 25, 2017
It was a scorching hot day. The heat index was above 100 degrees at only 9:00 a.m. It was late July on the Eastern shore of Maryland. I met with Ken Paynter’s laboratory crew from the University of Maryland, College Park, at the Knapp’s Narrows Marina in Tilghman Island. We were going out together to collect oysters, the focus of my dissertation project.  Read more . . .
 
SAV

Submerged Aquatic Vegetation (SAV): From Nuisance Weed to Darling of the Chesapeake Bay

Carrie Perkins • September 5, 2017
A generation ago, the seagrasses we know as submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) were unflatteringly referred to as “weeds,” usually in the same sentence as the words “nuisance” and “rid.” We’ve come a long way since then.  Read more . . .
 
blue crabs

Confessions of an Ecologist Turned Anthropologist: Differences in Data Collection

Adriane Michaelis • August 28, 2017
I am three years into my transition from working as a coastal ecologist to earning a doctorate in anthropology because I want to focus on the human side of coastal resource management. I want to learn and help explain how science-based fisheries management policies impact fishermen and others whose livelihoods depend on fisheries.  Read more . . .
 

Pages